davidmoxey.uk

Homepage of David Moxey, senior lecturer in engineering at the University of Exeter and a project leader of the Nektar++ spectral element framework.

I’m David Moxey, a senior lecturer in engineering in the College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences at the University of Exeter. I’m a project leader of the Nektar++ spectral/hp element framework, using it to further our understanding of complex fluid flows in aeronautics and industry.


My research interests lie primarily in the field of computational fluid dynamics, but are highly interdisciplinary. I am interested in problems lying at the intersection of applied mathematics, computational engineering and high performance computing.

Currently my goals focus around understanding fluid turbulence: how steady laminar flows transition to this chaotic state and how this impacts on real-world problems in the aeronautics industry. To achieve this I am developing efficient, robust and massively parallel high-order spectral element software that, together with modern computing technology, will form the next generation of computational flow simulation software.

On this site, you can take a look at my research page, see a list of my publications, seminars (including events I’m organising or will be attending), and look at my CV.

News

New preprint on Nektar++ 1st July 2019
See the new preprint on arXiv for Nektar++ which focuses on our recent capability enhancements and is under review in Computer Physics Communications for their 50th anniversary special issue.


New paper in Journal of Computational Physics 1st June 2019
I have a new paper out in Journal of Computational Physics that shows how the HDG method can be used to construct a weak Dirichlet boundary condition implementation.


Appointment as senior lecturer 14th February 2019
I’m very happy to say that I am now a senior lecturer in engineering at the University of Exeter.


Minisymposium at SIAM CSE 2019 11th February 2019
If you’re at SIAM CSE this year, I’m organising MS185 (Wed, Feb 27th, 9:45-11:25am, Room 303A) and MS222 (Wed, Feb 27th, 2:15-3:55pm, Room 202A) to talk about using high-order methods on modern computing architectures. Hope to see you there!


New paper out in Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 14th January 2019
I have a new paper out in Flow, Turbulence and Combustion, in which we investigate and demonstrate properties of turbulent structures called puffs within pipe flow.


New paper out in Computer Physics Communications 10th May 2018
I have a new paper out in Computer Physics Communications, where we investigate how to use many-core computing including Intel KNL and GPUs for curvilinear mesh generation. Check it out!